LanChesterLocal Weather Alerts
There are currently no active weather alerts.

SoLanco High School Graduation This Friday at 7 p.m To be broadcast on YouTube

Published by:

High School - Mule WEB

By: Keith Kaufman, Director of Community Relations for Solanco School District

 

The bleachers at the Solanco High School football field will be filled with jubilant family, friends and supportive community members Friday evening to celebrate as seniors in the Class of 2018 receive their diplomas. The graduation ceremony will be broadcast on Solanco YouTube Friday evening beginning at 7 p.m.

Here is a list of the seniors in the Solanco Class of 2018.

Distinguished Speaker David Lehman, Solanco Class of 1964, will speak to graduating seniors about how vision, persistence and hard work are key ingredients to success in life.  “Go out and work hard, stick with it, and always think positively about the future of the world, your country, your family, and especially yourself.” Lehman is a recent inductee into the National Wrestling Hall of Fame, and he is a leader in the oil and gas exploration industry.

Class valedictorian Sophie Plechner, salutatorian Abigail Nelson, and class president Tori Delp will also address their graduating classmates.

 

Congratulations and best of luck to the Solanco Class of 2018!

Oxford Area | June 2018 Edition

Published by:

WLRI 93FM FastCalendar

Oxford Area | June 2018 Edition

 http://www.oxfordart.org/

Daily, Mon-Sat,  June 1st through June 29th

10 am – 4 pm

Annual Student Art Show

38 S 3rd St, OxAA Main Gallery

http://www.oxfordart.org/gallery-exhibitions

Fri, June 1 – First Friday in Oxford

6 – 9 pm

Annual Student Art Show

Musical Performances by OxAA Music Academy Student or Faculty

38 S 3rd St, OxAA Main Gallery

 

6 – 9 pm

First Friday Community Art Project

38 S 3rd St, out front of the OxAA Main Gallery

 

6-9 pm

Paint Your Own Pottery

19 S 3rd St,  OxAA Annex

Tue, June 5

9:30-11:30 am

Weekly on Tuesday, until Jun 27, 2018

Watercolor Adventure (session #2)

19 S 3rd St,  OxAA Annex

 

4:30-5:30 pm

Art Bloom

The focus of Art Bloom is on the creative process for special needs students.  Lessons will build on skills and abilities, continuing to inspire. In the end, students will see their creations ‘blossom’ into a thing of beauty.

19 S 3rd St, OxAA Art Annex

 

Tue, June 12

9:30-11:30 am

Weekly on Tuesday, until Jun 27, 2018

Watercolor Adventure (session #2)

19 S 3rd St,  OxAA Annex

 

4:30-5:30 pm

Art Bloom

The focus of Art Bloom is on the creative process for special needs students.  Lessons will build on skills and abilities, continuing to inspire. In the end, students will see their creations ‘blossom’ into a thing of beauty.

19 S 3rd St, OxAA Art Annex

Summer Camps! http://www.oxfordart.org/summer-camps

Mon, June 18 – 22

9 am – 2 pm

Dive into Art (ages 5-7)

We’re going 20,000 leagues under the sea to use the mystique of the ocean for creating art. Dive in and spend a week making all kinds of nautically based artwork with us.

19 S 3rd St, OxAA Art Annex

Tues, June 19

9:30-11:30 am

Weekly on Tuesday, until Jun 27, 2018

Watercolor Adventure (session #2)

38 S 3rd St,  OxAA Main Gallery

 

4:30-5:30 pm

Art Bloom

The focus of Art Bloom is on the creative process for special needs students.  Lessons will build on skills and abilities, continuing to inspire. In the end, students will see their creations ‘blossom’ into a thing of beauty.

19 S 3rd St, OxAA Art Annex

Sat, June 23

2:00pm – 4:00pm

Jam Session

$5 entry

Monthly on the fourth Saturday

19 S 3rd St,  OxAA Annex

Sat, June 23

Annual Fundraiser – 50’s Dance Party

6 pm

The Oxford Arts Alliance Annual Fundraiser this year will feature dinner, dancing, live auction, giving tree items, and throwbacks to the 50’s to dance the night away! The proceeds from our annual fundraiser benefit children’s’ programs and overhead costs. Our fundraiser will aid us financially to continue bringing the arts and music culture to Oxford and the surrounding area.

http://www.oxfordart.org/annual-fundraiser

Rocky HIll Farm – 1140 Chrome Road, Oxford, PA 19363

 

More SUMMER CAMPS!!

http://www.oxfordart.org/sponsor-a-child-for-camp

Mon, June 25 – 29

9:00am – 2:00pm

Aspiring Artists – Art Camp (ages 11+)

Join us for a week of portfolio preparation! We’ll work on refining our art style by exploring different techniques, mediums and methods to enhance our artwork. Students will experiment using different types of paints, charcoal, oil pastels, collage, sculpting and they will work from observation – still lives, self portraits, figure drawings etc. Whether it’s for practice, or to submit to an art program, by the end of the week each student will have the key components of a fine arts portfolio.

38 S 3rd St,  OxAA Main Gallery

 

Sight & Sound  – Art Camp (ages 5-7)

Did you hear that? Let’s paint it!!! Campers will paint like Kandinsky and use the sounds of music to influence their artwork. You’ll also make your own instruments! Find out how to make your art dance in this camp!

19 S 3rd St,  OxAA Annex

 

Magic Kingdom – Music Camp (ages 5-8)

Cecil College; 107 Railroad Ave, Elkton, MD 21921

Come sing, dance and play to your favorite musical selections from the magic kingdom of Disney’s Frozen! Kids will enjoy a week packed with fun games and activities that will get them moving and playing along to their favorite soundtrack. Whether you’re an Elsa, Anna, Olaf, Sven, Kristoff or even Marshmallow fan, you’ll love the fun and magic offered throughout this week!

Registration must be made through Cecil College’s website. # KIK 680

38 S 3rd St, OxAA Main Gallery

19 S 3rd St,  OxAA Annex

Tues, June 26

9:30-11:30 am

Weekly on Tuesday, until Jun 27, 2018

Watercolor Adventure (session #2)

38 S 3rd St,  OxAA Main Gallery

 

4:30-5:30 pm

Art Bloom

The focus of Art Bloom is on the creative process for special needs students.  Lessons will build on skills and abilities, continuing to inspire. In the end, students will see their creations ‘blossom’ into a thing of beauty.

19 S 3rd St, OxAA Art Annex

 

Fri, June 29

6 – 8 pm

Annual Student Art Show – Closing Reception

Musical Performances by OxAA Music Academy Student or Faculty

38 S 3rd St, OxAA Main Gallery

 

Top 10 NASA iTech Energy Cycle Finalists Announced

Published by:

The NASA iTech Energy competition has selected the top 10 finalists to present their game-changing technologies at a forum next month in New York. The 2018 NASA iTech Cycle II Energy is a collaborative effort between NASA and the U.S. Department (DOE) of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) to find and foster innovative solutions for critical energy challenges on Earth and in space.
The 10 finalists were selected by a multi-disciplinary team of experts from NASA and ARPA E. The finalists will present June 13 and 14 at the NASA iTech Energy Forum, hosted by Citi Global at its headquarters in New York City. Representatives from NASA, DOE, other government agencies, industry, potential investors and others from across the United States will listen in as the finalists for NASA iTech share their innovative ideas.
“I look forward to seeing these 10 finalists present their ideas at the upcoming iTech forum in New York”, said Kira Blackwell, NASA iTech program executive in the Space Technology Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington. “This is a unique opportunity to present their technologies at an event convening two federal agencies and hosted by a global private sector bank seeking solutions to common energy challenges.”
The competition invited applicants to submit their concepts for: Fuel Cells and Regenerative Fuel Cells, High-energy-density Batteries and Supercapacitors, Solar Power Systems, Small Fission Power Systems, Innovative Power Management and Distribution and X-Factor Energy. The final category included entries that may not fit within a specific energy focus area but clearly demonstrate the potential to fill a critical need for NASA and humans on Earth.
The top three teams selected at the forum will be recognized during a nonmonetary awards ceremony on June 14 and will be available for interviews. Media interested in covering the forum should contact Gina Anderson at gina.n.anderson@nasa.gov by June 8 to register.
The top 10 NASA iTech Energy Cycle finalists are (in alphabetical order):
·AsterTech, LLC, Beavercreek, OH
3D Additive Manufacturing of High Efficiency and Light-Weight Solar Cells for In-Space Applications
·ATEIOS, San Diego, CA
Printed Batteries for Ubiquitous & Conformal Electronics
·Atomos, Denver, CO
Splitting the Atom to Connect the Planets: A Commercial Nuclear Power System for Space Operations
·Environment and Energy Benefit Co., West Sacramento, CA
BBB: X Factor Liquid Fuel
·iFeather, Boulder, CO
In-situ Fabrication of Extraterrestrial Aerogels for Transparency, Heat, and Energy Regulation (iFEATHER) for Habitat, Aeronautic and Space Vessel, and Space Suit Applications
·The Pennsylvania State University – Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University Park, PA
Lightweight Monolithic Microcell CPV for Space
·Stanford University – Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford, CA
Two C: Transportation Electrification through Ubiquitous Wireless Charging
·University of Michigan and Unified Solar Collaboration, Ann Arbor, MI
Photovoltaic Cell-Level Power Balancing Using Intrinsic Energy Storage for High-Efficiency, High-Reliability Solar Power
·V-Glass, Pewaukee, WI
Vacuum Glass for R-10 Windows
·WBGlobalSemi, Inc., Lakewood Ranch,
Commercializing High Power Silicon Carbide (SiC) Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs) and Power Modules for Power Management and Distributed Power Applications
NASA iTech is an initiative by the NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate and managed by the National Institute of Aerospace in Hampton, Virginia.
To watch the teams present their ideas live on June 13 (9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. EDT) and June 14 (9:10 a.m. – noon), visit:
For information about the NASA iTech initiative, visit:
For information about NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, visit:

Last chance to complete the 2017 Census of Agriculture

Published by:

Last chance to complete the 2017 Census of Agriculture
Less than two weeks to submit the questionnaire by mail

Watch Video:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Isua33c6vc

WASHINGTON, D.C. (USDA)– The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) is wrapping up data collection for the 2017 Census of Agriculture. To stay on track for data release in February 2019, the deadline for submitting the paper questionnaire is June 15, 2018. Farmers and ranchers who have not responded by June 15, 2018 still have until the end of July to complete the Census online through the secure website found on the cover of their Census form. Phone follow-up and personal interviews will also continue through July.

“The Census of Agriculture provides the only source of comprehensive agricultural data for every state and county in the nation,” said USDA Secretary Sonny Perdue. “These data are used to make important local, state, and national decisions that will have a very real impact on farmers, ranchers, ag operations, and rural communities. I encourage producers to respond online or to send in their paper form today.”

The questionnaire needs to be completed by everyone who received a form – including landowners who lease land to producers, those involved in conservation programs, even those who may have received the Census and do not farm. Every response matters.

“Our mission at NASS is to provide data in service to U.S. agriculture,” said NASS Administrator Hubert Hamer. “We extended the original Census deadline because many producers weren’t counted – and if they aren’t represented in these critical data, they risk being underserved in farm programs, disaster assistance, agricultural research, education, local policies, and business; it is imperative that we hear from everyone.”

Federal law, Title 7 USC 2204(g) Public Law 105-113, requires NASS to keep all information confidential, to use the data only for statistical purposes, and to only publish in aggregate form to prevent disclosing the identity of any individual producer or farm operation.

For more information about the 2017 Census of Agriculture or to respond online, visit www.agcensus.usda.gov. Improved in 2017, the online form is faster and more convenient than ever. For questions about or assistance with filling out the Census, call toll-free (888) 424-7828.

Dog Wardens to Canvass 22 Counties for Current Dog Licenses, Rabies Vaccinations in June

Published by:

Harrisburg, PA – The state Department of Agriculture announced today that state dog wardens will conduct dog license and rabies vaccination checks in 22 counties in June. This program aims to raise awareness of the importance of up-to-date dog licenses, and rabies vaccinations for dogs and cats to the health and safety of Pennsylvania communities.

Counties to be canvassed in June include Adams, Beaver, Bedford, Bradford, Cambria, Cameron, Clinton, Columbia, Crawford, Dauphin, Erie, Fulton, Greene, Juniata, Luzerne, Lycoming, Northumberland, Perry, Pike, Potter, Sullivan, and Venango counties. Canvassing began in April and will conclude this month.

June’s canvassing schedule is as follows:

June 4-8: Adams, Cambria, Crawford, Fulton, Juniata, Lycoming, and Pike counties
June 11-15: Beaver, Bedford, Perry, Potter, Northumberland, Sullivan, and Venango counties
June 18-22: Bradford, Cameron, and Greene counties
June 25-29: Clinton, Columbia, Dauphin, Erie, and Luzerne counties

Pennsylvania law requires all dogs three months and older to be licensed by January 1 of each year. The fee is $6.50 for each spayed or neutered dog and $8.50 for other dogs. Older adults and persons with disabilities may purchase a license for $4.50 for spayed or neutered dogs, and $6.50 for others. Dog licenses are available through county treasurers’ offices.

All dogs and non-feral cats three months of age and older must also be vaccinated against rabies. Booster vaccinations must be administered periodically to maintain lifelong immunity.

Violators may be cited with a maximum fine of $300 per violation plus court costs.

Dog wardens drive vehicles and wear uniforms labeled with “Pennsylvania Dog Law Enforcement Warden” in a keystone with a state seal. They wear a badge and state identification.

Wardens will request proof of licensure and proof of rabies vaccination. They will leave written notice for someone who is not home, or does not answer the door. Dog wardens will not enter a home or building without the owner’s permission.

For more information, visit www.licenseyourdogPA.com, or call 717-787-3062.

PA Ag Secretary Visits Octorara School District During 6th Annual OABEST Expo

Published by:

On Saturday, June 2, Secretary Redding visited Chester County for Octorara High School’s 6th Annual OABEST Expo. The event recognizes teachers, students and leadership in the community. It’s a fair that promotes the agriculture industry and work of the students.

 

Image may contain: sky, grass, outdoor and natureImage may contain: 5 people, people smiling, outdoorImage may contain: 2 people, people smiling, outdoor

Post:

“It was a great day to visit Octorara High School’s 6th annual OABEST Expo yesterday, to recognize the teachers, students and leadership in the community. It’s a fair that does an amazing job to promote the agriculture industry and work of the students.

Thank you Dr. Newcome, for your engagement with the student body and for your commitment to maximizing students’ opportunities for success. Best wishes for a well-deserved retirement!”

PennDOT, PA DUI Association Honors   New Drug Recognition Experts

Published by:

 
Harrisburg, PA – The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT), and the PA DUI association today announced that five state troopers and six municipal police officers have completed Drug Recognition Expert (DRE) training, and expect to be certified by the International Association of Chiefs of Police.
“The Drug Evaluation and Classification Program is a national effort to train police officers to determine when an individual has been driving under the influence of drugs and to identify the type of drug causing the impairment,” said David Andrascik, the DUI Association state program coordinator. The success of the program in Pennsylvania is a result of the strong partnerships with all agencies involved.
Drivers are reminded that operating a vehicle under the influence of alcohol or drugs is illegal and prescribed or over the counter substances may include side effects that will affect reaction time, cognition and overall concentration. Certified officers are also qualified to recognize whether an individual is suffering from a medical condition rather than drug impairment, and will make arrests accordingly.
Since Pennsylvania adopted the program in 2004, 97 troopers and 83 municipal police officers have become certified as DRE’s, and more than 16,000 evaluations have been conducted. In 2017 alone, more than 1,600 people suspected of being impaired by substances other than alcohol were investigated.
In about 40 percent of the cases motorists were under the influence of a narcotic analgesic drug which includes opiates. In 38 percent of the cases, cannabinoids such as marijuana were a factor. Additional drugs DRE’s investigated include, central nervous system depressant or stimulant drugs, like cocaine or amphetamines.
Troopers who completed the training include:

Trooper Nicholas Borrelli, Troop K, Philadelphia;

Trooper Sean Christofferson, Troop D, Mercer;

Trooper Thomas Dubovi, Jr., Troop E, Meadville;

Trooper Dylan Gelvin, Troop G, McConnellsburg;

Trooper Anthony Jendrzejewski, Troop H, Chambersburg.

Municipal police officers who completed the program include:

Officer Justin Erickson, Hermitage Police Department, Mercer County;

Patrolman Daniel Foster, North Huntingdon Township Police Department, Westmoreland County;

Officer Jory Harlan, Upper Allen Township Police Department, Cumberland County;

Officer John Kiefer, Castle Shannon Police Department, Allegheny County;

Patrolman Derrick Tardive, Altoona City Police Department, Blair County;

Officer Margaret Vorum-Leonard, Waynesburg Police Department, Greene County.

For more information about the DRE Program, visit www.decp.org

AMBER ALERT: License Plate: EKZ-5093

Published by:

    • AMBER Alert: 30115

    Carl Kennedy

    No photo available

    Vehicle Information

      • Make:
      • Suzuki
      • Model:
      • Forenza
      • Year:
      • 2007
      • Color:
      • Gold
      • Description:
      • Has a Johnny’s Auto Sales emblem on the trunk
      • License plate:
      • EKZ-5093
      • License state:
  • AMBER Alert: 30115

Emma Kennedy

No photo available

Vehicle Information

    • Make:
    • Suzuki
    • Model:
    • Forenza
    • Year:
    • 2007
    • Color:
    • Gold
    • Description:
    • Has a Johnny’s Auto Sales emblem on the trunk
    • License plate:
    • EKZ-5093
    • License state:
    • NC

Update: Updated vehicle information AMBER Alert: The child is believed to have been abducted by Carl Ray Kennedy who was last seen driving the listed vehicle.

Associated companions

No photo available

  • ANYONE HAVING INFORMATION SHOULD CONTACT
  • 1-800-843-5678
  • Danville Police Department 434-799-6510

Bay’s Water Getting Cleaner but Hard Work Ahead

Published by:

By: Andrea Sears

HARRISBURG, Pa. – Chesapeake Bay is getting cleaner, but a new analysis says much more needs to be done to clean up pollution coming from Pennsylvania rivers and streams.

The midpoint assessment of compliance with the Chesapeake Bay Clean Water Blueprint shows the water in the bay is clearer and aquatic vegetation and marine life are returning. Overall, the watershed states met the midpoint goal of a 60 percent reduction in phosphorus and sediment pollution.

But according to Harry Campbell, executive director of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation’s Pennsylvania office, that recovery is based almost entirely on improvements in wastewater treatment.

“We haven’t kept pace with our commitments in terms of implementing the practices that reduce pollution coming off of the land, keeping soils and nutrients on the land where they do good,” Campbell said.

With more than 35,000 family farms in the Pennsylvania portion of the Chesapeake watershed, agricultural runoff remains the leading source of nitrogen pollution. Campbell pointed out that many small farmers need help to implement cost-effective practices to prevent that runoff from getting into the 6,800 miles of Pennsylvania streams impaired by agricultural pollution.

“In order for them to be able to implement these practices, manage them and basically adapt to them, technical and financial assistance is oftentimes critical to the overall effort,” he said.

Campbell said educational outreach is also critical, as well as compliance with and enforcement of existing state clean-water laws. He said Pennsylvania has a plan to achieve the goals of the Clean Water Blueprint by the 2025 deadline, but the state and federal governments need to commit sufficient resources for implementation.

“Then and only then will we be successful in not only achieving our Chesapeake Bay commitments as a Commonwealth but improving the health condition of our rivers and streams right here in Pennsylvania,” he said.

Part of that plan, now under way, is the planting of 10 million trees along Pennsylvania streams and streets to absorb runoff and stabilize the soil.

Mariner East Pipelines Shut Down, Again

Published by:

By: Andrea Sears

CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. – Citing sinkholes, contaminated water wells and alleged poor managerial judgement, an administrative law judge has suspended operations and construction of the Mariner East pipelines.

In her ruling, Public Utility Commission Judge Elizabeth Barnes said Sunoco had put profit over best engineering practices. The emergency order suspended the flow of highly volatile liquid ethane through Mariner East 1, and construction on the Mariner East 2 pipelines.

Sam Rubin, eastern Pennsylvania organizer with the group Food and Water Watch, called the ruling welcome news.

“The serious and undeniable safety concerns that residents have been expressing for years now have finally been granted some modicum of acknowledgement by the State of Pennsylvania,” Rubin said.

Operation and construction of the pipelines has been halted before, but then allowed to resume. Sunoco has said it will ask the Public Utility Commission to overturn Judge Barnes’ decision.

Rubin called the pipelines “a perfect storm of safety risks;” and said the Mariner East 2 pipelines, if completed, will carry highly explosive liquids along a route with some 40 schools nearby.

“The final piece is that Sunoco has the worst safety record of any pipeline company in the country,” he said. “So, we have the most dangerous operator transporting the most dangerous contents immediately adjacent to the schools. That’s unacceptable.”

Sunoco’s lawyers contend that under Pennsylvania law, “past conduct or harm cannot form the basis for injunctive relief.”

Rubin cautioned that the decision to stop construction is an emergency ruling that is only binding during proceedings before the state Public Utility Commission. And the commission has overruled decisions by this judge in the past.

“I would be hesitant to oversell this,” he said. “But this is, of course, a very big step forward, and our work right now is to make sure this temporary halt becomes a full and final and permanent halt.”

Food and Water Watch is planning a rally on June 9 at the Chester County Courthouse, calling for a permanent halt to the Mariner East 2 pipelines.