LanChesterLocal Weather Alerts
There are currently no active weather alerts.

Daily Archives: June 11, 2018

Lancaster County Homeowners May Pay Octorara Area School District $312 More in 2018-19 School Year

Published by:

Key Points:

Presented By: Jeffery Curtis at the work session

As of May total revenues were $53,393,594

Spending was $54,954,887

Resulting in a $1.56M deficit

Potential tax increases may result in Chester County where median homestead property homeowners in the Octorara Area School District may pay an additional $56 per year, and $312  in Lancaster County. “That’s just a guess” Curtis states.

For more, tune in to the meeting here:

 

Wolf Administration Names New Pennsylvania State Forester

Published by:

Harrisburg, PA – A veteran of the Department of Conservation and Natural Resource’s Bureau of Forestry has been appointed state forester and will serve as director of the bureau.

Ellen M. Shultzabarger, who has worked for 14 years in various positions in the Bureau of Forestry, begins as the bureau director starting today.

“The director plays a critical role in the daily operations of the Bureau of Forestry, a vital role as state forester in national forest management issues, and also is an integral part of the leadership team of the department,” DCNR Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn said. “In Ellen, we have found someone with proven leadership abilities, a vision for the bureau and the department, and a strong natural science background.  She is a strong communicator, respected among her colleagues and works in a collaborative way to achieve the goals of the bureau and further the mission of the agency.”

Shultzabarger, 41, takes over the reins of Pennsylvania’s state forest system — one of the largest in the nation that is certified as well managed to ensure its future health.

The DCNR Bureau of Forestry manages 2.2 million acres of state forestland, conserves native wild plants, and promotes stewardship of all of the commonwealth’s forest resources for values including sustained yields of timber; clean water; plant and wildlife biodiversity and habitat; and wild character.

Some of the opportunities and challenges facing Pennsylvania’s forests and the bureau in the coming years include addressing the impacts of invasive species and diseases; stewardship of private forest lands; assessing recreational needs and opportunities; managing activities related to energy and rights-of-ways; adaptation planning for future climate change; and elevating the values of forests and trees.

Shultzabarger is the first woman to hold the position of state forester and bureau director since the creation about 125 years ago of what is now the DCNR Bureau of Forestry.

“I am truly excited and honored to have the opportunity to lead a talented group of forestry and natural resources professionals to sustainably manage the forests of Pennsylvania to assure long-term viability of working forests, both public and private,” Shultzabarger said. “I will strive to connect people to the outdoors, manage the state forests entrusted to us, and increase awareness of the importance and benefits of trees and forests.”

Shultzabarger has worked for the bureau in a variety of positions, with the most recent being the Chief of Conservation Science and Ecological Resources. During her tenure at DCNR, she has led a number of highly visible projects that span all aspects of its work, including oil and gas management; restoration and monitoring; wildlife management; invasive species; and recreation planning.
Before beginning work for DCNR in 2004, Shultzabarger served with the Massachusetts Division of Fish and Wildlife, Tufts University and several local and national non-profit conservation organizations.

Shultzabarger graduated from The Ohio State University with a bachelor’s degree in Natural Resources. She also received a graduate certification in Urban Environmental Planning and Policy from Tufts University.

Shultzabarger lives in Lancaster with her husband Brian and their two children.

FLOOD WARNING

Published by:

The National Weather Service in Mount Holly NJ has extended the

* Flood Warning for...
  Northwestern Camden County in southern New Jersey...
  Northern Burlington County in southern New Jersey...
  Southeastern Montgomery County in southeastern Pennsylvania...
  Southeastern Bucks County in southeastern Pennsylvania...
  Northeastern Chester County in southeastern Pennsylvania...
  Philadelphia County in southeastern Pennsylvania...
  Northeastern Delaware County in southeastern Pennsylvania...

* Until 1030 AM EDT Monday.

* At 349 AM EDT, Doppler radar and automated rain gauges indicated
  an area of very heavy rainfall fell across the warned area,
  resulting in a widespread rainfall between two and four inches,
  with some locations picking up close to five inches of rain.
  Although the heaviest rain has moved south of the region, it still
  is raining, and flooding continues. Parts of these counties also
  remain under a Flash Flood Warning with numerous road closures.
  Flooding will continue through at least the morning commute.

* Some locations that could experience flooding include...
  Philadelphia, Camden, Bensalem, Mount Laurel, Norristown,
  Willingboro, Medford, West Norriton, East Norriton, Lumberton,
  Burlington, Mount Holly, Riverside, Conshohocken, Palmyra, Ambler,
  Jenkintown, Narberth, Presidential Lakes Estates and Beverly.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

Turn around...don`t drown when encountering flooded roads. Most flood
deaths occur in vehicles.

Be especially cautious at night when it is harder to recognize the
dangers of flooding.

Excessive runoff from heavy rainfall will cause flooding of small
creeks and streams, urban areas, highways, streets and underpasses as
well as other drainage areas and low lying spots.

Please report flooding to your local law enforcement agency when you
can do so safely.

A Flood Warning means that flooding is imminent or occurring. All
interested parties should take necessary precautions immediately.

FLOOD ADVISORY REMAINS IN EFFECT

Published by:

THE FLOOD ADVISORY REMAINS IN EFFECT UNTIL 515 AM EDT FOR NORTHERN
NEW CASTLE...NORTHEASTERN CECIL...NORTHERN SALEM...WEST CENTRAL
CAMDEN...GLOUCESTER...CHESTER...SOUTHWESTERN PHILADELPHIA AND
DELAWARE COUNTIES...

At 249 AM EDT, Doppler radar indicated heavy rain that will cause
minor flooding in the advisory area. Moderate to locally heavy rain
with rainfall rates of up to one inch per hour is moving through the
advised area. This has a history of producing flash flooding, but
the rain is not as intense as it was earlier. Motorists should
exercise caution on area roads and watch for road closures.

Some locations that could experience flooding include...
Philadelphia, Wilmington, Newark, West Chester, Gloucester City,
Calvert, Chester, Deptford, West Deptford, Glassboro, Lindenwold,
Pennsville, Coatesville, Bellmawr, Yeadon, Westtown, Woodbury,
Pitman, Clayton and Carneys Point.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

Turn around...don`t drown when encountering flooded roads. Most flood
deaths occur in vehicles.

Be especially cautious at night when it is harder to recognize the
dangers of flooding.

Excessive runoff from heavy rainfall will cause flooding of small
creeks and streams, urban areas, highways, streets and underpasses as
well as other drainage areas and low lying spots.

A Flood Advisory means river or stream flows are elevated, or ponding
of water in urban or other areas is occurring or is imminent.