New features coming to MyWLRI.com

Published by:

We’re adding some great new tools to help keep you posted. This weekend we will be working on the website and on the various features on our old site which needed some upgrading so all users have the same experience. Thank you for your suggestions and comments over the past few months. We have been developing a series of code that will aide in online security following the release of Windows 10. You will find minimal functionality of most pages this weekend as we finalize testing and launch the new MyWLRI.com next week. Please continue to check back throughout the weekend while we deploy each section of the website. Please send us error reports to  092015@mywlri.com (email only valid this weekend) so we can address any issues the arise following the upgrade.  There may be a period of time where the entire site may load as a “white screen” even when refreshed. This is a normal process we use to prevent access while we are working on front end pages of MyWLRI.com.  Down time should be minimal, however we wanted to ensure you that we take every moment of down time very seriously.

Thank you for visiting MyWLRI.com and for your patience with us while we bring the whole website up to par.

-MyWLRI.com Webmaster

PENNSYLVANIA PARTICIPATES IN NATIONAL DUI CRACKDOWN FOR LABOR DAY

Published by:

Labor Day Enforcement for Impaired Driving
August 16 to September 7, 2015
 
The Pennsylvania Driving Under the Influence Association, (PA DUI Assn), announces and supports police across the Commonwealth conducting aggressive impaired driving enforcement for the National Labor Day Crackdown “Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over.”
Law Enforcement from all jurisdictions which includes more than 50 DUI Task Forces across Pennsylvania will patrol and conduct enforcement events by either stationary checkpoints or roving patrols. The National Crackdown begins on August 16 and will continue through the Labor Day weekend.
 
Particular focus will be on drivers under the influence of drugs, regardless if they are prescription or over the counter. If a driver is impaired, they are incapable of safe driving regardless of what they consumed.
            “The goal is to save lives and to get drivers to understand that operating a motor vehicle is serious business; too many drivers after a while become complacent, both young and older drivers,” said C. Stephen Erni, Executive Director of the PA DUI Association. “Most drivers today understand that drinking alcohol and operating a vehicle don’t mix and they can be involved in a crash or arrested, but we have more work to do when it comes to getting them to understand that some prescription medicines or even over the counter medicines can cause a driver to be impaired to the point they are incapable of safely driving,” he added.  
 
Pennsylvania started recognizing DUI crashes were not exclusive to alcohol consumption approximately ten years ago when they joined a handful of other states that started training drug recognition experts or DRE’s to combat the growing problem of drugged drivers. The Drug Recognition Classification Program was developed by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and approved by the International Police Chief’s Association. Currently there are 150 trained Drug Recognition Experts in the Commonwealth, including state police and municipal officers. Only a sworn, active police officer can become and practice as a DRE. Additionally, The PA DUI Association and partners train officers in A.R.I.D.E; an advanced roadside impaired driving 2-day course to identify signs of drugs versus alcohol when a driver is suspected of being impaired.
In 2014, statewide there were 4694 Drugged, (legal and illegal) Driving crashes in Pennsylvania. The most frequent drug used by drivers as determined by a DRE is marijuana, and later confirmed by a blood test. Statewide, DRE’s were called out by other officers to evaluate a suspected impaired driver 1, 377 times for possible drugged driving and other than alcohol consumption by 132 DRE’s currently active in 2014. A total of 52,636 DUI arrests occurred that same year with 20,691 of that total charged with 3802 (d) of the DUI Law or Drugged driving.
The Labor Day holiday period represents the last of the summer parties or picnics and signals the start of the new school or college year. Many drivers on the road are squeezing in last minute weekend getaways. It’s a time where drivers need to be at top performance to handle sudden incidents that occur when driving on any road or any distance whether it’s too the corner store only a few blocks away or much further.

 

PENNSYLVANIA PARTICIPATES IN NATIONAL DUI CRACKDOWN FOR LABOR DAY

Published by:

Labor Day Enforcement for Impaired Driving
August 16 to September 7, 2015
 
The Pennsylvania Driving Under the Influence Association, (PA DUI Assn), announces and supports police across the Commonwealth conducting aggressive impaired driving enforcement for the Na
Law Enforcement from all jurisdictions which includes more than 50 DUI Task Forces across Pennsylvania will patrol and conduct enforcement events by either stationary checkpoints or roving patrols. The National Crackdown begins on August 16 and will continue through the Labor Day weekend.
 
Particular focus will be on drivers under the influence of drugs, regardless if they are prescription or over the counter. If a driver is impaired, they are incapable of safe driving regardless of what they consumed.
            “The goal is to save lives and to get drivers to understand that operating a motor vehicle is serious business; too many drivers after a while become complacent, both young and older drivers,” said C. Stephen Erni, Executive Director of the PA DUI Association. “Most drivers today understand that drinking alcohol and operating a vehicle don’t mix and they can be involved in a crash or arrested, but we have more work to do when it comes to getting them to understand that some prescription medicines or even over the counter medicines can cause a driver to be impaired to the point they are incapable of safely driving,” he added.  
 
Pennsylvania started recognizing DUI crashes were not exclusive to alcohol consumption approximately ten years ago when they joined a handful of other states that started training drug recognition experts or DRE’s to combat the growing problem of drugged drivers. The Drug Recognition Classification Program was developed by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and approved by the International Police Chief’s Association. Currently there are 150 trained Drug Recognition Experts in the Commonwealth, including state police and municipal officers. Only a sworn, active police officer can become and practice as a DRE. Additionally, The PA DUI Association and partners train officers in A.R.I.D.E; an advanced roadside impaired driving 2-day course to identify signs of drugs versus alcohol when a driver is suspected of being impaired.
In 2014, statewide there were 4694 Drugged, (legal and illegal) Driving crashes in Pennsylvania. The most frequent drug used by drivers as determined by a DRE is marijuana, and later confirmed by a blood test. Statewide, DRE’s were called out by other officers to evaluate a suspected impaired driver 1, 377 times for possible drugged driving and other than alcohol consumption by 132 DRE’s currently active in 2014. A total of 52,636 DUI arrests occurred that same year with 20,691 of that total charged with 3802 (d) of the DUI Law or Drugged driving.
The Labor Day holiday period represents the last of the summer parties or picnics and signals the start of the new school or college year. Many drivers on the road are squeezing in last minute weekend getaways. It’s a time where drivers need to be at top performance to handle sudden incidents that occur when driving on any road or any distance whether it’s too the corner store only a few blocks away or much further.

A Healthy Start: Reasons to Vaccinate Your Child National Immunization Awareness Month is a reminder that we all need vaccines right from the start and throughout our lives.

Published by:

WEST CHESTER, PA – Immunization gives parents the safe, proven power to protect their children from 14 serious and potentially deadly diseases before they turn 2 years old. To celebrate the importance of immunizations for a healthy start and throughout our lives – and to make sure children are protected with all the vaccines they need – the Chester County Health Department is joining partners nationwide in recognizing August as National Immunization Awareness Month. The theme for this week is “A Healthy Start” and will focus specifically on protecting babies from birth through age 2 with immunizations. To help ensure “A Healthy Start,” Chester County Health Department works to prevent transmission of hepatitis B right at birth as advocated by the Immunization Action Coalition (IAC). The IAC’s Give Birth to the End of Hepatitis B initiative (www.immunize.org/protect-newborns/) urges hospitals and birthing centers to meet the national standard of care by providing a universal birth dose of hepatitis B vaccine to babies before they leave the hospital. A birth dose of hepatitis B vaccine can prevent hepatitis B transmission – yet today, only 70% of U.S. infants receive the vaccine within 3 days of birth. Pennsylvania’s statewide rate is about 84%, and Chester County hospitals are working to improve on that accomplishment. Paoli Hospital was recently added to the IAC’s Hepatitis B Birth Dose Honor Roll – the first hospital in Pennsylvania to be so recognized – by achieving an outstanding hepatitis B vaccination rate of 93%. Other county hospitals are also on track to achieve this distinction. “Children who don’t receive recommended vaccines are at risk of getting the disease or illness, and of having a severe case,” said Jeanne E. Casner, Chester County Health Director. “Every dose of every vaccine is important to protect your child and others in the community from infectious diseases. Talk to your doctor or other health care professional to make sure your child is up to date on all vaccines he or she needs.” Today’s childhood vaccines protect against serious and potential life-threatening diseases including polio, measles, whooping cough and chickenpox. There are many important reasons to make sure your child is vaccinated:  Immunizations can protect your child from 14 serious diseases before they turn 2 years old, “Protecting You and Your Environment”  Vaccination is very safe and effective,  Immunization can save your family time and money,  Immunization can protect future generations by reducing the prevalence of serious diseases. When children are not vaccinated, they are at increased risk and can spread diseases to others in their family and community – including babies who are too young to be fully vaccinated, and people with weakened immune systems due to cancer and other health conditions. Parents can find out more about the recommended immunization schedule at www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents or www.chesco.org